Tag Archives: GPCR

“Two years into Xi Jinping’s tenure as China’s president,…



“Two years into Xi Jinping’s tenure as China’s president, many analysts consider him to be the most powerful leader since Deng Xiaoping, the man who oversaw China’s opening to the world and its market-oriented policies after the chaos of the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution. Roderick MacFarquhar, a scholar of elite Communist Party politics at Harvard University, goes one step further. Mr. Xi, he says, is the most powerful Chinese leader since Chairman Mao Zedong, the “Great Helmsman” who declared the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949 and was worshiped almost as a god by millions of fanatical Red Guards.

Yet for all of Mr. Xi’s personal power, his campaign against corruption is fraught with danger, putting at risk the future of the Communist Party he is determined to save, Professor MacFarquhar said in a recent talk at the University of Hong Kong. In an interview, he explained why.”

For more, see Michael Forsythe, “Q. and A.:” Roderick MacFarquhar on Xi Jinping’s High-Risk Campaign to Save the Communist Party,“ The New York Times (30 Jan 2015)

Image credit: Lan Hongguang/Xinhua, via Associated Press

“In recent days, news of the passing of Li Junxu (李君旭) has…



In recent days, news of the passing of Li Junxu (李君旭) has been little more than a whisper, muffled amid the story of the crackdown on Dongguan’s sex trade. But 38 years ago, Li Junxu was the centre of a great big news story when it was reported that the 23 year-old factory worker had been arrested for fabricating a text called “The Last Will and Testament of the Premier” (总理遗言).

The world of Chinese politics is a black box, and black-box politics naturally gives rise to “rumour.” I remember very clearly the end of the Cultural Revolution, how people would whisper things privately and pass on speculative information. The core of most of this speculation was Jiang Qing, Mao Zedong’s last wife. In 1976, Deng Xiaoping was criticized in the movement to “strike back against the right-deviationist wind.” In the midst of this, Zhou Enlai passed away and this drove an undercurrent of rumour and speculation.”

For the full account, see Qian Gang’s “Who is Li Junxu" at China Media Project (17 Feb 2014)

Image: Li Junxu. From Yuan Minzhu, Reassessing the ‘Premier’s Will Case’ of 1976 That I Experienced

“Now, my grandfather is aging. His foes are either aging…



Now, my grandfather is aging. His foes are either aging or dead, and they talk to each other very little. Lei Enzhan, the “rightist” teacher, once said that he didn’t care who treated him badly four decades ago. But my grandfather still feels much regret. In fact, he wants to say sorry to Lei Enzhan."

For more, see Shawn Lei, My Grandfather the Red Guard," at Tea Leaf Nation (25 June 2013) 

Image: Wikimedia Commons

“On April 29, 1968, a young Chinese dissident named Lin…



On April 29, 1968, a young Chinese dissident named Lin Zhao was secretly executed by firing squad. In 2013, on the 45th anniversary of her execution, her name resurfaced in the public sphere, as news broke that police had prevented people paying tribute to her at her grave.”

For the full story, see Ashley Sun, “Lin Zhao’s Ghost Still Haunting China, Online and Off” at Tea Leaf Nation (16 May 2013)

On April 29, 1968, a young Chinese dissident named Lin Zhao was secretly executed by firing squad. In 2013, on the 45th anniversary of her execution, her name resurfaced in the public sphere, as news broke that police had prevented people paying tribute to her at her grave.”

For the full story, see Ashley Sun, “Lin Zhao’s Ghost Still Haunting China, Online and Off” at Tea Leaf Nation (16 May 2013)

A new, handy device for China’s mobile phone users? Introducing Micro Lei Feng:

 ”If you lost your mobile phone on a bus, for example, you can tell Micro Lei Feng as much as you can about your lost phone. Micro Lei Feng will then inform the transport and police authorities of your lost phone, and they can keep their eyes open for it.”

For the full story, see “Did you lose something? Micro Lei Feng can help” by Barry van Wyk at Danwei (1 March 2013)

Image: “Our own army is for the people, the people warmly love our army” (1973) from the Lei Feng collection at Chineseposters.net.

“Families in Wartime: ‘Red Kite, Blue Kite’ and ‘Fish for Jimmy’” – Pamela Paul introduces two new children’s books which explore (respectively) China’s Cultural Revolution and Japanese internment in the United States. NYT (20 Feb 2013) Link

(via Networked East Asia)